The Graphics Grapevine

Since 2004, we’ve written and gathered dozens of articles on Graphic Design, Marketing, Copywriting, and the Creative Process in the The Graphics Grapevine quarterly ezine. Similar content is now being shared as single-topic blog posts on this site. Selected back articles from the Grapevine are also available here.

Six Writing Secrets You’re Born Knowing

Posted by on Apr 26, 2016 in Blog, Copywriting, Marketing | 0 comments

Six Writing Secrets You’re Born Knowing

Guest post by John Forde, Copywriter’s Roundtable On my way to the AWAI Copywriting Bootcamp recently, I thought back on just HOW MANY things we’ve covered from that stage. One of the many things my frequent co-presenter, the great Jen Stevens, and I revealed are six “natural born” copywriting secrets. “Natural born” because, far as we could tell, these are the kinds of things you don’t really need to learn… because you know them from birth. What kinds of things? Well, it starts by simply acknowledging to yourself that persuading somebody in print, in video, in real life… is often just about having a keener understanding of what makes humans tick. People are complicated, of course. But we picked these six because seemed to get to the core of what a lot of what we — and you — do when writing copy. Without further ado, here’s the rundown… 1) “THE SPARKING MATCH” At the start the movie The Usual Suspects, Gabriel Byrne’s character touches a cigarette to a book of matches. They spark then flame across. He drops them onto a line of gunpowder and the flames race across a burning shipyard dock. The “natural born” insight? We’re programmed to use little details to help us sort out what’s going on. Which is why using them to tell big stories can help make those stories feel present and real. In copy, we call them “actualities.” And using them judiciously has an added bonus: they can also help fix other copy problems automatically. How so? It turns out that, to pick the most compelling details, you also have to think more clearly about the message you want to convey. 2) USE YOUR “SANTOKU” A Japanese “santoku” knife — you can buy one at any kitchen store — does three things well: It chops, dices, and minces. Imagine if you had a mental santoku you could use to chop, dice, and mince your copywriting projects down to a more manageable size. We know this instinctively, when we tackle all kinds of other projects one thing at a time. The secret many writers don’t reveal is that they often write in small pieces too, rather than in a linear way. 3) THE RIVER OF RELEVANCE While details have value, you still need to make sure it’s only the emotionally relevant details you use. What’s “emotional relevance?” It’s the way your prospect needs to feel to be open to your message. For babies, it’s pretty obvious that feelings trump logic. But the truth is, that natural directive never really goes away. It’s how we select what we’ll listen to and what we’ll ignore. That’s why your sales copy has to take those relevant emotions into consideration too. Don’t seek to MAKE a prospect feel. Look for — and return to — those details, metaphors, and stories that connect to emotions your reader is already likely to have. 4) SLAY THE BLOATED MONSTER William Zinsser warns about “bloated monsters that lie in ambush for the writer trying to put together a clean English sentence.” Time is the resource we cannot buy. It’s a lot to ask someone to spend that precious time on something that’s boring or confusing, no matter how good the prize that awaits. In writing, that’s just as true. Which is why...

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20 Things I’ve Learned in 20 Years

Posted by on Mar 30, 2016 in Blog, Copywriting, Creative Process, Graphic Design | 0 comments

20 Things I’ve Learned in 20 Years

In 1996 I was having a blast doing creative projects for friends and family on my first personal computer, while studying the principles of design from library books and the occasional seminar that came near my rural part of northern California. My brother Tim mostly taught me the basics of Adobe Pagemaker (precursor to Adobe InDesign) from across the continent via email. It soon dawned on me that if I started a ‘desktop publishing’ business, I could justify all the toys (hardware and software) I needed to take the fun to the next level. After five years of operation in California’s Napa Valley, constantly honing my craft, my (now) husband and I made the jump across the Pacific, and Kauai Design was born. As I celebrate 20 years, I’m looking back at a few of the essential lessons I’ve learned along the way. CLIENT RELATIONS 1. Listen… …to understand my client’s goals, products, services, and target audience so we’re on the same page, solving the right problem 2. Inform Share design expertise, technical knowledge, and resources, give honest feedback, and communicate throughout the process. I’ve learned it works better to err on the side of over-communicating than under-. 3. Be Generous After meeting with a new client, I summarize our agreement in a written proposal, spelling out the cost, scope of services and timeline for their project. Then I strive to exceed my promises and over-deliver on the goods. 4. Be open-minded Design is subjective. As with all art, personal taste looms large. While I find long-standing principles of good design valid, and generally worth heeding, sometimes they must be over-ridden by the client’s preferences or an inspired but offbeat idea. 5. Small business owners rock I am continually impressed with the vision and commitment, the willingness to take risks and do what it takes to launch and maintain a business. Entrepreneurs are a special breed and I’m honored to have collaborated with so many on their branding and promotional needs. THE CREATIVE PROCESS 6. Get psyched Get my head (and body) in a good space before sitting down with a project. Approach the work with the mindset of being receptive, curious, interested, eager, and open to relationships between the parts. 7. Be willing to walk away For me, a swim in the ocean is the best way to clear my mind, work out my body, and re-boot the creative process when I’m feeling stuck. 8. Stay open to possibility Allow for the unexpected flashes of inspiration, the seemingly off-the-wall ideas, and the breakthroughs that emerge from “mistakes” 9. Trust the process Know that the unfolding requires incubation and marination and sometimes even divine intervention. Stretching to take on something I’ve never done before, though sometimes intimidating, has always made me a better designer. See let-it-incubate-germinate-marinate/ INDISPENSABLE DESIGN PRINCIPLES 10. Start with art The reader’s eye will be drawn to a picture first. Make it count. Fonts, colors, and other graphic elements can take their lead from the art. 11. Crop tightly and boldly for impact Actually I knew this already from my years of experience in photography and picture framing but it has been strongly reinforced over the years. See Cropping-in-the-Viewfinder.pdf 12. Capture images at high resolution For print purposes, 300 ppi (pixels per inch) is standard. I...

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Let it incubate, germinate, marinate…

Posted by on Feb 19, 2016 in Blog, Copywriting, Creative Process, Graphic Design | 0 comments

Let it incubate, germinate, marinate…

I’ve long been a believer in immersing myself in information and images related to a design or writing project, then backing off, focusing on something completely different. The data then simmers and churns in my unconscious mind, connecting the dots (as Steve Jobs called it), generating new associations and relationships, insights and revelations. In my 20 years as a designer, I’ve learned to relax into a receptive space, to trust the natural ripening or gestation process. In September 2015 I shared a post about the little book, Free Play by Stephen Nachmanovitch. (See “Free Play and Creativity”) That book is packed so full of intriguing ideas that it holds the record for the number of stickies I’ve ever stuck in a half-inch thick book. I marked dozens of passages I wanted to re-read and re-think. Nachmanovitch notes that our language of nouns and verbs contributes to the illusion that we, the subjects, control the creative process (the object). But in the act of creation, there are unseen, unconscious forces doing the heavy lifting. Our job is sometimes to give our analytical, judging brains a rest and let the muse, our intuitive wisdom, our DNA, and the collective consciousness speak. RIPENING In a chapter called “Ripening,” Nachmanovitch writes, “In one phase of the [creative] process we exercise technique and try things out step by step. In another phase the conscious working of ideas sinks down and assimilates with the unconscious. Then there is  the seemingly magical part of the process in which the material resurfaces, enriched and ripened by its unconscious sojourn. It is not, of course the material that resurfaces, it is we who resurface, more ripe and ready to bear the material.” Our stuck places may well hold the greatest potential for creative breakthroughs if we can surrender, drop the struggle, and walk away. The process then goes ‘underground’ to cook, incubate, germinate, marinate (choose your metaphor…) the raw material and emerge with fresh connections, insights and aha moments. “Like a birth, creative expression bursts out, of its own accord, when you and it are ripe.”      -Stephen Nachmanovitch Solutions usually come when we are NOT focused on the problem. Answers usually come when we are NOT focused on the question, but when we are mentally relaxed and open. We could be showering, driving, taking a walk, meditating, lying in bed, floating in the ocean. The bottom line? Take breaks. Chill. Let go. Trust. It’s one of life’s paradoxes that the secret to creative productivity is ‘non-productive’ down time, incubating, germinating, marinating ideas. And I find that having faith in the mysterious creative process is good practice for building faith in the perfect unfolding of life in general. See also How Creativity Works and Learning to Trust Be Sociable,...

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Why Designers Love the Ampersand

Posted by on Jan 22, 2016 in Blog, Copywriting, Graphic Design | 0 comments

Why Designers Love the Ampersand

A ROMANCE THAT DATES BACK TO POMPEII by John Brownlee for Fast Company, January 20, 2016 Cheerily nuzzled above the “7” key like a pear-shaped pill bug, the ampersand is perhaps the most intriguing character on the keyboard. While all letters and punctuation marks look similar enough in abstract, the ampersand feels unique, like a shape-shifter that could transform at a moment’s notice. For type designers and aficionados both, it isn’t so much a character as it is a character, “usually a tirelessly entertaining one, perhaps an uncle with too many tricks,” as Simon Garfield wrote in his 2012 book, Just My Type. No wonder the ampersand attracts such endless fascination. There are coloring books about ampersands, ampersand-a-day Tumblr blogs, and a whole cottage industry of t-shirt makers working in ampersands. Perhaps the most epic undertaking of ampersand-ian tribute came in 2010, when over 400 different designers came together to create an entire font made up of nothing but distinctive and unrepeated ampersands. The project speaks to the ampersand’s individuality: a font of nothing but ampersands is easy to imagine in a way that a font of only lower case “j“s could never be. But if an ampersand feels like it can be anything, what makes an ampersand an ampersand? Where does it come from? And why, exactly, do type designers love it so much more than other characters? Flickr user arnoKath EVERY AMPERSAND STARTS WITH “ET” Ampersand design may seem infinitely variable, but no matter how stylized or abstracted, every ampersand is, at heart, an et—or Latin for “and.” Some typefaces (especially handwritten-style ones) make this more obvious: it doesn’t take too much squinting to see an “et” in the ampersands of Trebuchet MS, Garamond Italic, Casalon Italic, or even Papyrus. But you can see the Latin DNA of “et” even in an Arial, Helvetica, or Times New Roman ampersand, where the “e” has become a half-closed figure eight, forming the cross of a “t” with its bottom descender. And if you’ve ever handwritten an ampersand, chances are you’ve done so by drawing a loopy cursive “E,” bisected lengthwise by a straight line: another stylized “et.” The first known ampersand was scrawled on a wall in 1st-century Pompeii by an anonymous graffiti artist practicing his Roman cursive. It is related, but not identical to, a rival mark created during the same time period by Marcus Tiro, a former slave of Cicero who proposed what is known as the Tironian et (or “⁊”) as part of one of the world’s first shorthand system. Although the Tironian “et” eventually fell out of favor—except, bizarrely, in Ireland, where it is still used in Gaelic signage today—the Latin “et” continued to gain popularity, perhaps because it wasn’t tied to a larger shorthand system that scribes needed to learn in full. Instead, by the 8th century, they had stylized the Latin “et” into a symbol that looks very much like a modern ampersand. But it would take another thousand years for the ampersand to get its modern name. AND PER SE & Technically, the word ampersand is a mondegreen—meaning a jumble of words that is routinely misheard—created from the phrase “and per se &,” itself a meaningless word salad which only makes sense in historical context. IN THE 19TH CENTURY, THE AMPERSAND WAS RECOGNIZED AS THE 27TH LETTER OF THE ALPHABET, AND TAUGHT AS SUCH TO BRITISH SCHOOLCHILDREN. In...

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Ellen DeGeneres Invites ʻEverybody Design Nowʻ

Posted by on Nov 21, 2015 in Blog, Creative Process, Graphic Design | 0 comments

Ellen DeGeneres Invites ʻEverybody Design Nowʻ

Fresh News | November 15, 2015 Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s new campaign initiative to take its Design in the Classroom program nationwide has gained substantial support from television host Ellen DeGeneres. DeGeneres recently matched contributions up to $100,000, and to date, more than $325,000 has been raised toward the museum’s $500,000 goal to launch the national program. The program itself introduces classes K-12 to design thinking and learning through interactive hands-on workshops. “As the nation’s design museum, it is our mission to ensure every student is introduced to the power of design and understands how it can be used to solve everyday problems,” said Caroline Baumann, director of the museum. “We’re so pleased to have the commitment of Ellen DeGeneres, her brand ED and countless other friends in the design world. Their support will enable us to bring this free program to schools across the country. We’re hopeful that with the public’s help we will reach and inspire even more of tomorrow’s designers.” “This program encourages students to think like designers as they engage in the design process through active observation, critical discussion, the act of making, visual communication and presentation and critique,” said Caroline Payson, director of education. “It has been a longtime dream to bring the unique experience of Design in the Classroom to every student in America.” Through Design Challenge kits, children are tasked to use common materials to build a prototype that solves a design problem and learn that design thinking can be used to solve problems faced in daily life. The 45-minute workshop instills creative confidence and encourages students to approach the world in a visual way. The program imparts essential 21st-century skills, such as critical thinking, visual literacy, teamwork and problem solving, and can be used to enhance the teaching of any subject matter, including mathematics, science, environmental studies, language arts, history and visual arts. In year one, the museum’s educators will conduct four regional trainings, appoint select educators as regional ambassadors and conduct in-person follow-up visits to evaluate the integration of design into the curriculum. The national objective for the program will be accomplished through a “teachers training teachers” model. With every 100 educators trained, the program could reach 7,500 students per year. If each of these educators went on to train 10 of their peers, that’s 1,000 educators per year and 75,000 students. The museum is now inviting the public to support the campaign through the crowdfunding platform Razoo. Photographs: Jessica Nunez Copyright: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Be Sociable,...

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What John Cleese, Stephen King, Paul Simon and Anthony Trollope Can Teach You About Creativity

Posted by on Oct 26, 2015 in Blog, Creative Process | 0 comments

What John Cleese, Stephen King, Paul Simon and Anthony Trollope Can Teach You About Creativity

BY JAMES JOHNSON • AUGUST 13, 2015 • blog.shareasimage.com Anthony Trollope was one of the world’s most creative writers. In the 1800’s he regularly released novels over 700 pages in length, multiple times a year, and wrote whole series so long that Lord of the Rings looks like a short story. And, he did all of this while working a full time job for the British Postal Service. According to Stephen King in his book On Writing, he was able to stay so creative for one simple reason – his process: “He wrote for two and a half hours before work. This schedule was ironclad. If he was mid-sentence when this two and a half hours expired, he left that sentence unfinished until the next morning.” If he finished a book in that time too, he’d simply write The End, set it aside, and start writing his next book. Now you’re probably thinking, “Wow, that’s insane! How can you be that creative, that often?” And, you wouldn’t be the only one. The truth is,  a creative process is all you need to be more creative. In fact, it’s the only part of creativity that you have any control over at all… The Creative Process John Cleese is a comedy legend – you might remember him from Monty Python, Fawlty Towers and A Fish Called Wanda – but he’s also a keen psychologist. And, not too long ago, he did a lot of research into the realm of creativity. And in this research he came to the conclusion that: “Creativity is not a talent, but a way of operating” That is to say that you creativity isn’t a feature only a few people have. It’s something you can unlock. For example, in comparisons between people who are deemed intelligent, such as Engineers and Writers, and those who aren’t, there was no difference in I.Q that suggests the smarter you are, the more creative you are. As long as you have a base level of intelligence, you can be as creative as anybody else on the planet. Which is great news. But how do you unlock this creative potential hidden deep inside of you? Well, Cleese points out there are 5 ways you can become more creative if you arrange them correctly. These are: Space Time Time (Again) Confidence Humour Now, there are no guarantees that any of these will give you your big idea instantly. As is the case with anything creative, there are good days, and there are bad days. You could sit around for hours and get nothing, or you could sit down, sip your coffee and be hit with a freight train of original ideas. As the man himself says: “This is the extraordinary thing about creativity: If just you keep your mind resting against the subject in a friendly but persistent way, sooner or later you will get a reward from your unconscious.” But what all of these steps will do, more importantly, is get you into an openmind. Which is the breeding ground for all creativity. Open Your Mind… There are two types of thinking when it comes to your work: The open mind The closed mind The closed mind is where you spend most of your day. It’s where you complete tasks, think logically and get work done. This is your productive state of mind. The open mind is where you need to get to if you want to be creative. It’s where you...

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Free Play and Creativity

Posted by on Sep 8, 2015 in Blog, Creative Process | 0 comments

Free Play and Creativity

“The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves.” -Carl Jung My husband read that quote to me and then the first paragraph of ‘Mind at Play,’ a chapter in Stephen Nachmanovitch’s dense yet liberating little book Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art. I was hooked. I’m fascinated and infatuated with the creative process and adore being in it. Now I’m inhaling the rest of the book, and sharing some highlights with you. May it inspire your own inner child. Here’s that first paragraph: “Improvisation, composition, writing, painting, theater, invention, all creative acts are forms of play, the starting place of creativity in the human growth cycle, and one of the great primal life functions. Without play, learning and evolution are not possible. Play is the taproot from which original art springs; it is the raw stuff that the artist channels and organizes with all his learning and technique. Technique itself springs from play because we can acquire technique only by the practice of practice, by persistently experimenting and playing with our tools and testing their limits and resistances. Creative work is play; it is free speculation using the materials of one’s chosen form. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves. Artists play with color and space. Musicians play with sound and silence. Eros plays with lovers. Gods play with the universe. Children play with everything they can get their hands on.” Nachmanovitch, an improvisational musician, suggests that, although each art form comes with its own language and lore, there’s a kind of ‘metalearning’ and ‘metadoing’ that transfers across art forms, where the essence of creativity dwells. No matter the medium of expression, “what we have to express is already with us, is us, so the work of creativity is not a matter of making the material come, but of unblocking the obstacles to its natural flow.” He writes of creativity, knowing that “our subject is inherently a mystery. It cannot be fully expressed in words, because it concerns the deep preverbal levels of spirit. No kind of linear organization can do justice to this subject; by its nature it does not lay flat on the page.” “We are all improvisors,” he observes. “The most common form of improvisation is ordinary speech. As we talk and listen, we are drawing on a set of building blocks (vocabulary) and rules for combining (grammar). But the sentences we make with them may never have been said before and may never be said again. Every conversation is a form of jazz. the activity of instantaneous creation is as ordinary to us as breathing.” There is a zen quality to this material. Regarding being in the moment, Nachmanovitch notes, “When we drop the blinders of our preconceptions, we are virtually propelled by every circumstance into the present time and the present mind: the moment, the whole moment, and nothing but the moment. This is the state of mind taught and strengthened by the art of improvisation … We can depend on the world being a perpetual surprise in perpetual motion. And a perpetual invitation to create.” He goes on to explore the nature of the ‘juice’ or raw material of creativity and...

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Recipe for a Perfect Logo (infographic)

Posted by on Jul 25, 2015 in Blog, Creative Process, Graphic Design, Marketing | 0 comments

Recipe for a Perfect Logo (infographic)

Image credit: David Joyce | FLICKR Original blog post: Kim LaChance Shandrow | ENTREPRENEUR Close your eyes and imagine Apple’s logo. Now think of Nike’s. How about Target’s? We’re willing to bet that you conjured up images for each in your mind’s eye in less than a second or so. They’re that memorable. As you can see, logos are so much more than simple symbols. They’re epic icons. Logos are the face of your company, the deliverers of the all-important lasting impression, crucial visual representations of your business, what you do and what you’re about. Accordingly, the utmost care and meticulousness should be taken when designing yours. If you already have a logo, the same goes for redesigning it. Spare no attention to detail. Related: 10 Questions to Ask When Designing Your Company’s Logo From the font to the color, to the use of negative space and beyond, the aesthetic elements of a logo greatly impact how your company (and its offerings) are perceived by customers. Does it attract them or repel them? Does it stand out or fade into the background? Does it distinctly identify your brand or confuse it with your competitors? These are all critical questions to ask during the research and design phase, but far from the only ones, only a smattering of the main ingredients for the master recipe for cooking up a successful logo. Check out the famous logo-packed CompanyFolders infographic below for a complete list of specific, actionable tips and ideas to help you design the best logo possible for your brand.   Need help with your organization’s ‘signature?’ Logo design is one of our favorite kinds of projects. Let Kauai Design help make it shine!   Be Sociable,...

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The Power of Branding

Posted by on Jun 28, 2015 in Blog, Graphic Design, Marketing | 0 comments

The Power of Branding

17 selected quotes on the nature and impacts of a solid brand identity MICHAEL EISNER. “A brand is a living entity – and it is enriched or undermined cumulatively over time, the product of a thousand small gestures.” STEVE FORBES.  “Your brand is the single most important investment you can make in your business.” UNKNOWN. “Your entire company should be considered your branding department.” MALCOLM FORBES. “There is just no way any management with any intelligence and foresight cannot recognize the value of a corporate image. It is the best, single marketable investment that a company can make.” SCOTT COOK. “A brand is no longer what we tell the consumer it is – it is what consumers tell each other it is.” JEFF BEZOS. “Your brand is what other people say about you when you’re not in the room.” KIM TIMOTHY. “A brand is how one customer describes your business to another.” CHRISTOPHER BETZTER. Brand equity is the sum of all the hearts and minds of every single person that comes into contact with your company.” SCOTT TALGO. “A brand that captures your mind gains behavior. A brand that captures your heart gains commitment.” ZIG ZIGLAR. “If people like you they will listen to you, but if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.” PAUL RAND.  “Design is the silent ambassador of your brand.” DAVID AAKER. “Branding adds spirit and a soul to what would otherwise be a robotic, automated, generic price-value proposition. If branding is ultimately about the creation of human meaning, it follows logically that it is the humans who must ultimately provide it.” AL REIS & LAURA REIS. “What is the single most important objective of the marketing process? We believe it’s the process of branding. Marketing is building a brand in the mind of the prospect.” SCOTT BEDBURY. “A great brand taps into emotions. Emotions drive most, if not all, of our decisions. A brand reaches out with a powerful connecting experience. It’s an emotional connecting point that transcends the product.” KEVIN THOMSON. “Organizations in the future will manage feelings, beliefs, perceptions and values – the asset of emotional capital – as the hidden resources with the power to translate people’s knowledge into positive action.” CHARLES R. PETTIS III. “A brand is the proprietary visual, emotional, rational and cultural image that you associate with a company or product.” UNKNOWN. “The three key rules of marketing are brand recognition, brand recognition, brand recognition.” For more on branding, see Brand Thinking, The Right time to Rebrand, Branding Your Organization, and Your Organization’s Image   Be Sociable,...

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Social Media Images That Work

Posted by on May 21, 2015 in Blog, Creative Process, Graphic Design, Marketing | 0 comments

Social Media Images That Work

by James Johnson, ShareAsImage.com If you’ve been looking to supercharge your social media strategy, you probably know a lot about the benefits of using images. But, how much do you know about actually creating scientifically shareable images? Turns out, there’s tons of actionable, research-backed advice on how to create social media images that get shared—the ideal colors, fonts, text, and more, all leveraging what we know about design, psychology and the Internet to get more shares and engagement. By the end of this article you’re going to be fully aware of how to make images that your readers can’t help but share. All backed by science.   What Makes A Shareable Social Media Image? A shareable social media image is made up of five components: Emotion: When your readers feel it, they’ll share it. Relevance: Your image should not only fit your niche, but fit your audience too. Colors: Using the right colors, to get maximum shares. Typography: Choosing a font that not only looks good, but also says what you’re trying to say. Hashtags and Text: Using the right words, phrases and hashtags that will make your audience interact. In the article you’re going to learn how you can take advantage of all of these elements, and put them together to create the best social images you possibly can. 1. Emotion Create Epic Content (Or Nobody Will Share It) Before I carry on, there’s one thing I do need to mention: You need to treat your images as content. And not just any sort of content. I mean the epic kind, that’s going to add a ton of value to your reader’s life. Because that’s the only content people share, right? If you’re creating images because you feel you need to – and just scatter them throughout your news feed – you’re not going to get anywhere. Your images should:    Back up points you’ve made    Show statistics    Provide tweetable (or valuable) quotes    Add depth    Go above and beyond the content you’ve written So, be sure that the images you use – or make – aren’t just there for the sake of it. Treat them as content and put a high value on what goes on them. What Makes An Image Emotional (And Shareable)? Emotion is the biggest piece of the sharing puzzle. And it’s the driving force behind all five points on this list – so it deserves a lot of attention. So, what makes an image emotional? As it turns out, there are a lot of factors: Color: Studies of abstract art have shown that the way color is used and distributed across a piece controls the emotions you feel. For example, black creates feelings at the despair end of the spectrum and bright primary colors can create joy and happiness. Font Choice: You’ll learn about this in depth in section four. Complexity: This isn’t complex designs – more on that next – but emotionalcomplexity. Research shows that the more feelings your images can convey,the more viral it will go. Showing one of these five things: Research from Harvard studied what makes marketing campaigns, and their images, go viral. They found that: Admiration, Interest, Serenity, Amazement and Astonishment were the most shared emotions. Simple Designs, Big Emotions You don’t have to be a graphic designer to create solid social media images. In fact, far from it. I’ve run twitter feeds for months without a single minute of design under my belt. All it takes is a little knowledge of how design works, and what it takes...

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